THE BULLETIN — News to know

Quick hits on the news of the day, odds and ends and commentary.

Gun control groups box out gun rights groups for rally permits, Bedford residents seek anti-shutdown resolution amid regional case surge, a mysterious red panda escape, and more headlines

NEWS TO KNOW Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.• Pro-gun control organizations booked almost all available time slots for permitted demonstrations on Capitol Square on the same day gun rights groups planned to stage a repeat of their rally last year that drew thousands.—Washington Post • Ballad Health officials say November has been the deadliest month for COVID-19 at their facilities in Tennessee and Virginia.—Bristol Herald-Courier• A "No Shutdown" resolution opposing any pandemic restrictions and calling for the arrest of any state officials attempting to enforce them is being pushed in Bedford.—News & Advance• Carilion Clinic and the...

Analysts watching for post-holiday case spike, Virginia liquor sales up $46 million this year (so far), winter sports’ future uncertain, and more headlines

NEWS TO KNOW Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.• Data analysts advising Gov. Ralph Northam's administration say a "two-week shutdown" after Thanksgiving could be necessary if there's a big jump in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations in Virginia.—WRIC• Virginia Beach's sheriff and former deputy police chief will sit on another commission tasked with examining the 2019 mass shooting at a municipal building in the city. A Virginia Beach delegate criticized the pick, saying no one involved in the local law enforcement response to the shooting should be on the panel.—Virginian-Pilot• Surging liquor sales helped pad Virginia's budget, which...
Virginia Mercury

State officials urge Virginians to stay home for Thanksgiving, rapid COVID-19 tests flow to Va. nursing homes, Charlottesville christens ‘Spruce Bader Ginsburg,’ and more headlines

NEWS TO KNOW Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.• As Thanksgiving looms and COVID-19 cases spike nationwide, Virginia officials are asking residents to help slow the virus' spread by staying home for the holiday or holding celebrations outdoors or online.—Virginian-Pilot• Virginia has begun shipping 239,000 rapid COVID-19 tests to nursing homes ahead of Thanksgiving as the facilities look for ways residents can meet safely with family members for the holiday. Almost half of Virginia's nearly 3,900 COVID deaths have been nursing home residents.—Richmond Times-Dispatch• Virginia Democrats are weighing their options after Republicans said they'll use their voting...
Virginia Mercury

Dulles gun show cancelled, health officials suspend permit for Christian day care in Radford, Williamsburg exhibit shows early map propaganda, and more headlines

NEWS TO KNOW Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.• A massive gun show planned at the Dulles Expo Center has been cancelled after a judge rejected organizers' arguments it should be allowed to go on despite Virginia's COVID-19 restrictions.—Associated Press• Health officials suspended a permit for a Christian day care in Radford for refusing to follow COVID-19 guidelines. The pastor called the virus a "hoax" intended to bring about an "anti-Christ Kingdom on earth.”—Washington Post• A women's basketball player at Virginia Wesleyan University says she was dismissed from the school over an off-campus Thanksgiving gathering that drew...

Virginia schools will have some flexibility in administering state SOLs this spring

Virginia schools will have some flexibility in administering Standards of Learning tests to elementary and middle school students this spring, according to a Thursday news release from the state Department of Education.Instead of being required to take the full slate of normally state-mandated tests — designed to set minimum expectations for what students should know at the end of every school year — younger students will have the option of taking local assessments in history, social science and English under waivers and emergency guidance issued by state Superintendent James Lane, the Virginia Board of Education, and Secretary of Education Atif...

Lawsuit: Tyson plant managers in Iowa bet money on how many workers would contract COVID-19

A wrongful death lawsuit tied to COVID-19 infections in a Waterloo, Iowa, pork processing plant alleges that during the initial stages of the pandemic, Tyson Foods ordered employees to report for work while supervisors privately wagered money on the number of workers who would be sickened by the deadly virus. Earlier this year, the family of the late Isidro Fernandez sued the meatpacking company, alleging Fernandez was exposed to the coronavirus at the Waterloo plant where he worked. The lawsuit alleges Tyson Foods is guilty of a “willful and wanton disregard for workplace safety.” In a written statement issued late Wednesday,...
Virginia Mercury

Northam calls staying home for Thanksgiving ‘an act of love,’ gun show organizer sues over new COVID-19 restrictions, battleship in Norfolk decks the halls, and more headlines

NEWS TO KNOW Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.• Gov. Ralph Northam asked Virginians to stay home for Thanksgiving, calling it "an act of love" that would prevent worsening the spread of COVID-19.—Associated Press• Northam said he was motivated to impose new COVID-19 restrictions after "seeing mobile morgues outside hospitals" in other states. "We don’t need that to happen to Virginia,” he said.—Roanoke Times• The governor's office clarified that its 250-person limit on gatherings shouldn't be interpreted to prevent UVA from playing a football game this weekend.—Richmond Times-Dispatch• The organizer of a Northern Virginia gun show is...

With Northam’s signature, new eviction and utility cut-off protections take effect

Gov. Ralph Northam signed a revised state budget Wednesday that restricts evictions and prohibits utilities from cutting off power, water and gas through the end of the state of emergency.“This budget will help keep people in their homes with their lights on and their water running,” Northam said.The new rules go into effect immediately.The eviction protections are phased. Through the end of the year, landlords are now required to serve tenants who don’t pay their rent with a written notice informing them of state and local rent relief programs, which covers back rent. A landlord is allowed to proceed...

With legalization on the table, medical marijuana producers push to loosen restrictions

As Virginia begins its first earnest conversations about legalizing recreational marijuana, the state’s nascent medical marijuana industry is just getting off the ground. The first producer opened in Bristol last month. The remaining three licensees in Richmond, Portsmouth and Manassas aim to begin serving patients by the end of the year.And when the General Assembly convenes in January, the companies are hoping that as lawmakers consider allowing recreational use, they also act to ease up on the medical side.Their big ask: Permission to sell the plant in its most basic, smokable form --- unprocessed flower.“Virginia’s medical program is one...

Testing sites in Prince William and health workers in Roanoke overwhelmed, VMI committee begins reviewing Confederate symbols, and more headlines

NEWS TO KNOW Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.• Free COVID-19 testing sites in Prince William County are being overwhelmed by high demand. The county says they can't add more tests due to "a lack of lab capacity."—Prince William Times• COVID-19 cases in the Roanoke area are rising so fast "there are times local public health workers can’t get to them all."—Roanoke Times• The U.S. Navy is increasing COVID-19 restrictions for its personnel in the Hampton Roads area.—Daily Press• A Chesterfield County teachers' group is asking the state to provide clearer rules for school reopenings after a...