Northam’s first veto of the year; Redistricting case will start in U.S. Supreme Court; Capitol Police search for man who sent obscene pictures and more headlines

NEWS TO KNOW
Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.

• Gov. Ralph Northam issued his first veto of the session, striking down a bill that would require state police to automatically issue concealed weapon permits to non-residents if background checks and other administrative reviews aren’t completed within 90 days. He said the measure “would create public safety concerns.” – Daily Press

• A Chesterfield County judge accused administrators of a regional jail in Prince William County of telling her a “bunch of lies” about their treatment of a mentally ill inmate who was never transferred to a psychiatric hospital despite an order to the contrary. “You are incapable of telling the truth.” It’s the second time in two months a judge has raised issues over the jail’s treatment of inmates. – Richmond Times-Dispatch

• A proposal to speed public access to gubernatorial records died in the final days of the General Assembly session when lawmakers couldn’t find the $3.6 million to pay for it. – Richmond Times-Dispatch

• The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Monday in the House of Delegates racial gerrymandering case. – WCVE

• The New Yorker profiled an Augusta-County based business that helps bail immigrants out of ICE detention centers on the condition that they wear GPS ankle monitors, which they must rent for $420 a month. Clients are “desperate to get out of detention to rejoin with their families. They’ll agree to anything, and they do.” – The New Yorker

• Caseworkers in Norfolk are working to help 4,200 people move out public housing ahead of a planned redevelopment. – The Virginian-Pilot

• Albemarle County Public Schools sent a high school student home for wearing a hat with a Confederate flag on it. It was the first day of a new dress code policy banning hate symbols. – The Daily Progress

• A helicopter pilot who killed himself and one bystander when he crashed in Williamsburg had diagnoses of dementia, cognitive decline, tremors and Parkinson’s disease, but the FAA had little power to prevent him from flying, despite revoking his license. – The Virginia Gazette

• Fairfax County Public Schools, the state’s largest school district, is facing three separate federal lawsuits filed by students who allege administrators botched sexual misconduct allegations. – Associated Press

• Sen. Bill Carrico, R-Grayson, acknowledged he gave Del. Todd Pillion a private heads up that he was retiring before publicly announcing his decision just after the party filing deadline to run to replace him had passed. But he said he’s upset by suggestions he timed things to assure Pillion the party’s nomination. – Bristol Herald Courier

• U.S. Rep. Denver Riggleman, R-5th District, falsely told constituents who emailed his office that he opposed Trump’s emergency declaration to build a border wall when he, in fact, voted for it. Riggleman called it a mistake and said he sent out corrections.  – TPM

• The owners of Colonial Downs selected a site in Chesapeake for its fourth planned historical horse racing slots parlor. – The Virginian-Pilot

• Virginia Capitol Police are searching for a man accused of sending pictures of male genitals to the staffers of several state senators. He was last seen in Arizona. – Richmond Times-Dispatch

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Mechelle Hankerson
Mechelle, born and raised in Virginia Beach, is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University with a degree in mass communications and a concentration in print journalism. She covered the General Assembly for the university’s Capital News Service and was among 12 student journalists in swing states selected by the Washington Post to cover the 2012 presidential election. For the past five years, she has covered local government, crime, housing, infrastructure and other issues at the Raleigh News & Observer and The Virginian-Pilot, where she most recently covered the state’s biggest city, Virginia Beach.