The Bulletin

Candidate says PAC illegally got her security clearance; Restraints in public schools; Vikings batted climate change and other headlines

By: - August 29, 2018 7:49 am

NEWS TO KNOW
Our daily roundup of headlines from Virginia and elsewhere.

Spangberger says PAC illegally obtained her federal security clearance application

The former CIA officer running for Congress against Dave Brat, Abigail Spanberger, says there’s no way the Republican group could have gotten the document legally, The New York Times reports.
The PAC, meanwhile, insists it got the document in response to a Freedom of Information Act Request, and is using it to link Spanberger to a private Islamic school where she briefly worked as a substitute teacher.
National security experts called it alarming that the document would be released.
“It calls for a tremendous amount of extremely private, personal information, and so to the person whose information is at stake, it is extremely significant,” a former assistant attorney general for national security told the Times.

More news

  • Gov. Ralph Northam’s environmental justice advisory board recommended the state rescind permits for the Mountain Valley and Atlantic Coast pipelines.  – The Washington Post
  • Children were physically restrained in Virginia public schools  – either strapped to a chair or placed in seclusion – more than 6,000 times during the most recent school year for which data is available. – The News Leader
  • The Roanoke County Board of Supervisors told the School Board it would cost $1 million to fund a plan to place an 15 additional school resource officers in county schools. – The Roanoke Times
  • Virginia Democrats are now arguing that all the petitions submitted by an independent congressional candidate helped onto the ballot by a Republican opponent are invalid because her home address is wrong. – The Virginian-Pilot
  • Historic Jamestowne is now offering a “First Africans” tour as it works to begin recognizing the role of slavery at the colony. – Associated Press
  • The Supreme Court of Virginia elected Donald W. Lemons to serve another term as chief justice. – Associated Press
  • Roanoke Public Schools is testing a program to lock up students’ phones during classes, saying the devices have become too great a distraction. – The Roanoke Times
  • The two candidates seeking to replace U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, Ben Cline and Jennifer Lewis, have agreed to debate in Lynchburg on Oct. 22. – The Roanoke Times
  • The American Red Cross acquired Virginia Blood Services, ending competition for blood sales to area hospitals in central Virginia. –Richmond Times Dispatch
  • The House of Delegates’ school safety committee heard from students and experts about bullying and mental illness in a meeting at Weyers Cave. – The News Virginian
  • Bristol City Council is trying to remove a member after passing guidelines for council conduct that call for members to “avoid making public comments about individuals, staff members, fellow council members, residents or members of the media.” – Bristol Herald Courier
  • Boxwood blight, a destructive fungal disease, has hit Danville. – Danville Register & Bee
  • A researcher at William & Mary is studying how Vikings responded to climate change and sea-level drops. – Associated Press
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Ned Oliver
Ned Oliver

Ned, a Lexington native, has been a fulltime journalist since 2008, beginning at The News-Gazette in Lexington, and including stints at the Berkshire Eagle, in Berkshire County, Mass., and the Times-Dispatch and Style Weekly in Richmond. He is a graduate of Bard College at Simon’s Rock, in Great Barrington, Mass. He was named Virginia's outstanding journalist for 2020 by the Virginia Press Association.

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