The U.S. Capitol. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — Targeted Democratic incumbents from Virginia’s U.S. congressional delegation were padding their war chests as the election year kicked off.

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered the landscape for politicians in Virginia and across the country as many have been forced to cut back on active fundraising and campaigning. But the most recent campaign finance reports show that Virginia Democrats who are expected to face the toughest reelection challenges this fall had stocked up more cash than their competitors by the end of March.

The Republican expected to face the toughest race — freshman Rep. Denver Riggleman — had less cash on hand than his top-raising Democratic opponent, although Riggleman has raised nearly twice as much during the election cycle.

Congressional incumbents often have early fundraising advantages, and some of their rivals posted strong fundraising numbers in the first quarter of this year. The dynamics could also change in the coming months after primaries and conventions whittle down the field of candidates hoping to unseat incumbents.

In addition to a high-profile 2020 Senate race, Virginia is home to four congressional races that national Democratic and Republican party committees are eyeing as prime pickup opportunities in the fall. The contested congressional races include Riggleman’s seat and three others that Democrats flipped from GOP control in 2018.

Earlier this month, campaigns were required to release fundraising reports detailing their cash hauls through March 31. Here’s what they revealed about Virginia’s most closely watched races:

Sen. Mark Warner 

Warner raised $1.8 million in the first quarter of 2020. He has raised $12.5 million in the cycle. He had $8.5 million in the bank at the end of March.

Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., talks to reporters in May at a breakfast in Washington hosted by the Christian Science Monitor. (Michael Bonfigli/ Christian Science Monitor)

Three Republicans with fairly low profiles in state politics have qualified to compete in a June 23 primary for the chance to challenge Warner in the general election: retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Daniel Gade, Army reservist Tom Speciale and Nottoway County teacher Alissa Baldwin.

Gade is the top GOP fundraiser in the crowd so far, raking in a total of $488,700 so far this campaign cycle. He raised $222,100 in the first quarter of 2020 and closed March with $66,000 cash on hand.

Speciale raised just $59,200 during the quarter and $63,900 so far in the cycle. He had $22,300 in the bank.

Baldwin raised $4,600 so far in the cycle, including $3,500 in self-financing. She ended March with $2,500 in the bank.

Political analysts at the University of Virginia Center for Politics and the Cook Political Report rate Warner’s race as solidly Democratic.

Rep. Elaine Luria (D-2nd)

Luria, a freshman Democrat who narrowly defeated Republican incumbent Rep. Scott Taylor in 2018, could face a rematch against him this fall.

Taylor dropped his bid against Warner, announcing that he’ll instead vie for his old seat in 2020. But first he’s facing a June 23 GOP primary against Ben Loyola, Jarome Bell and Andy Baan.

From left: Former U.S. Rep. Scott Taylor, a Virginia Beach Republican, and current Congresswoman Elaine Luria, D-Norfolk, could square off in rematch of their 2018 race for the 2nd District seat. (Images from U.S. House of Representatives and Luria’s campaign)

Luria raised $937,400 in the first quarter of this year and $3 million for the full cycle. She had $2.3 million cash on hand at the end of March.

Taylor reported raising $552,300 for the full cycle and closed March with $371,300 in the bank.

Loyola, a retired Navy captain, raised $55,000 for the first quarter and $152,900 for the cycle. He had $25,300 cash on hand.

Bell has raised a total of $36,700 for the cycle. Baan has raised $25,500 for the cycle, including $15,000 in self-financing.

The University of Virginia Center for Politics rates the race as leaning Democratic; the Cook Political Report rates it as a tossup.

Rep. Abigail Spanberger (D-7th)

Spanberger, a freshman Democrat, beat incumbent Republican Rep. Dave Brat by just 2 points in 2018 in one of the hardest-fought races in the country. As the GOP eyes her seat as a 2020 pickup opportunity, Spanberger has been raking in cash, making her one of the top fundraisers in the U.S. House this cycle.

U.S. Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Henrico. (Ned Oliver/Virginia Mercury)

She raised $1.1 million in the first quarter of 2020 and a total of $3.8 million for the cycle. She had $3.1 million in the bank at the end of last month.

Republican Del. Nicholas Freitas is among the Republicans who have lined up to challenge the incumbent congresswoman. He raised $405,700 in the quarter and $627,100 for the cycle. He had $247,900 cash on hand.

The other top fundraisers among the GOP contenders are Del. John McGuire and religious freedom nonprofit leader Tina Ramirez.

Del. Nick Freitas, R-Culpeper, speaks on the floor of the House of Delegates. (Ned Oliver/Virginia Mercury)

McGuire raised $153,100 for the quarter and $318,200 for the full cycle. He had $118,200 in the bank.

Ramirez raised $84,200 in the quarter and $311,400 during the cycle. She had $33,000 in the bank.

Del. John McGuire, R-Goochland. (Virginia House of Delegates)

Republicans will choose the GOP candidate in the 7th District with a convention, where plans have been complicated due to the pandemic.

The University of Virginia Center for Politics rates the race as leaning Democratic; the Cook Political Report rates it as a tossup.

Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-10th)

Wexton is also on Republicans’ list of top targets, although she’s seen as safer than her freshman Democratic colleagues. The Cook Political report rates her race as likely Democratic.

She raised $481,400 in the first three months of 2020 and $2.5 million in the full election cycle. She ended March with $1.8 million cash on hand.

Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-VA), questions Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill May 22, 2019 in Washington, DC. The committee heard testimony from the Secretary on the State of the International Financial System, and President Donald Trump’s tax returns. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Her highest-raising GOP competitors are Marine veteran Rob Jones and Army veteran Jeff Dove.

Jones raised $173,100 in the first quarter and $375,600 for the cycle, closing March with $100,000 in the bank.

Dove brought in $153,300 in the quarter and $652,500 for the cycle, including $55,300 in self-financing. He had $57,300 in the bank at the end of the month.

The 10th District will also choose its GOP nominee via convention, which was slated for May 30 but could be rescheduled.

Rep. Denver Riggleman (R-5th)

Riggleman, a freshman Republican, is on the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s list of offensive targets.

He raised $314,100 in the first quarter and $1.5 million for the cycle, including $10,000 self-financing. He ended March with $264,200 in the bank.

Fifth Congressional District Republican Candidate Denver Riggleman campaigns at Richmond International Airport with Vice President Mike Pence in 2018. (Ned Oliver/Virginia Mercury)

That’s less than what Marine veteran Roger Dean Huffstetler — the top-raising Democrat in the race — had in his war chest. Huffstetler had $340,200 cash on hand at the end of last month.

He has raised less than Riggleman in the cycle; he brought in $182,000 during the first quarter and $808,400 during the total 2020 cycle.

Other Democrats in the race are Cameron Webb, a University of Virginia doctor; Marine veteran Claire Russo; and real estate broker John Lesinski.

Webb raised $176,300 in the quarter and $510,700 in the cycle. He had $208,600 in the bank.

Russo reported raising $219,000 in the quarter and $430,800 for the full cycle. She closed March with $273,000 cash on hand.

Lesinski’s first quarter haul was $109,600. He raised $259,600 in the cycle, including $15,000 of self-financing. He had $74,400 in the bank.

The Democratic nominee will be determined in a June 23 primary.

Republican Bob Good, a former athletics official at Liberty University, is also challenging Riggleman for the seat. The GOP nominating convention was slated for April 25, but was delayed due to the pandemic.

Good raised $30,900 in the first quarter and $140,200 in the cycle. He closed March with $41,600 cash on hand.

The University of Virginia Center for Politics and the Cook Political Report rate the race as likely Republican.